Fetal development: The 1st trimester

Fetal development: The 1st trimester

Fetal development begins soon after invention. Find out how your baby grows and develops during the first gear spare .By Mayo Clinic Staff
You ‘re meaning. Congratulations ! You ‘ll undoubtedly spend the months ahead wondering how your baby is growing and developing. What does your baby look like ? How boastful is he or she ? When will you feel the foremost kick back ?

Fetal exploitation typically follows a predictable course. Find out what happens during the first clean-cut by checking out this hebdomadally calendar of events. Keep in mind that measurements are estimate .

Weeks 1 and 2: Getting ready

It might seem foreign, but you ‘re not actually pregnant the first week or two of the clock allotted to your pregnancy. Yes, you read that correctly !
Conception typically occurs about two weeks after your last period begins. To calculate your estimated ascribable date, your health caution provider will count ahead 40 weeks from the begin of your end period. This means your period is counted as part of your pregnancy — even though you were n’t fraught at the time .

Week 3: Fertilization

Fertilization and implantation

Fertilization and implantation

Fertilization and implantation

During fertilization, the sperm and egg unite in one of the fallopian tube to form a zygote. then the zygote travels down the fallopian metro, where it becomes a morula. Once it reaches the uterus, the morula becomes a blastocyst. The blastocyst then burrows into the uterine line — a process called implantation .
The sperm and egg connect in one of your fallopian tubes to form a single-celled entity called a zygote. If more than one egg is released and fertilized or if the inseminate egg splits into two, you might have multiple zygotes .
The zygote typically has 46 chromosomes — 23 from the biological mother and 23 from the biological don. These chromosomes help determine your child ‘s sex and physical traits .
soon after fertilization, the zygote travels down the fallopian tube toward the uterus. At the same time, it will begin dividing to form a bunch of cells resembling a bantam boo — a morula .

Week 4: Implantation

The quickly dividing ball of cells — now known as a blastocyst — has begun to burrow into the uterine lining ( endometrium ). This process is called implantation .
Within the blastocyst, the inner group of cells will become the embryo. The outer layer will give resurrect to separate of the placenta, which will nourish your baby throughout the pregnancy .

Week 5: Hormone levels increase

Fetal development three weeks after conception

Embryo three weeks after conception

Fetal development three weeks after conception

By the end of the fifth workweek of pregnancy — three weeks after creation — your hormone levels are rising .
The fifth week of pregnancy, or the one-third week after conception, the levels of HCG hormone produced by the blastocyst quickly increase. This signals your ovaries to stop release eggs and produce more estrogen and progesterone. Increased levels of these hormones stop your menstrual period, often the beginning sign of pregnancy, and fuel the growth of the placenta .
The embryo is now made of three layers. The top layer — the ectoderm — will give resurrect to your baby ‘s outermost layer of skin, central and peripheral nervous systems, eyes, and inner ears .
Your baby ‘s heart and a primitive circulatory organization will form in the center layer of cells — the mesoderm. This layer of cells will besides serve as the initiation for your baby ‘s bones, ligaments, kidneys and much of the generative system .
The inner layer of cells — the endoderm — is where your baby ‘s lungs and intestines will develop .

Week 6: The neural tube closes

Fetal development four weeks after conception

Embryo four weeks after conception

Fetal development four weeks after conception

By the end of the sixth week of pregnancy — four weeks after creation — little buds appear that will become arms .
Growth is rapid this workweek. just four weeks after concept, the nervous tube along your baby ‘s back is closing. The baby ‘s brain and spinal anesthesia cord will develop from the nervous tube. The kernel and other organs besides are starting to form .
Structures necessary to the constitution of the eyes and ears develop. Small buds appear that will soon become arms. Your baby ‘s consistency begins to take on a C-shaped curvature .

Week 7: Baby’s head develops

Fetal development five weeks after conception

Embryo five weeks after conception

Fetal development five weeks after conception

By the conclusion of the seventh week of pregnancy — five weeks after creation — your baby ‘s brain and grimace are the focus of development .
seven weeks into your pregnancy, or five weeks after conception, your child ‘s mind and face are growing. Depressions that will give rise to nostrils become visible, and the beginnings of the retina form .
Lower limb bud that will become legs appear and the arm bud that sprouted last week now take on the form of paddles .

Week 8: Baby’s nose forms

Fetal development six weeks after conception

Embryo six weeks after conception

Fetal development six weeks after conception

By the end of the one-eighth week of pregnancy — six weeks after conception — your child might be about 1/2 column inch ( 11 to 14 millimeters ) long .
Eight weeks into your pregnancy, or six weeks after creation, your baby ‘s lower arm buds take on the shape of paddles. Fingers have begun to form. belittled swellings outlining the future shell-shaped parts of your baby ‘s ears develop and the eyes become obvious. The amphetamine sass and nose have formed. The torso and neck begin to straighten .
By the end of this workweek, your baby might be about 1/2 inch ( 11 to 14 millimeters ) long from crown to rump — about half the diameter of a U.S. stern .

Week 9: Baby’s toes appear

Fetal development seven weeks after conception

Embryo seven weeks after conception

Fetal development seven weeks after conception

By the goal of the ninth week of pregnancy — seven weeks after conception — your baby ‘s elbows appear .
In the ninth workweek of pregnancy, or seven weeks after creation, your baby ‘s arms develop and elbows appear. Toes are visible and eyelid form. Your baby ‘s head is large but hush has a ailing formed chin .
By the end of this workweek, your pamper might be a little less than 3/4 edge ( 16 to 18 millimeters ) long from crown to rump — the diameter of a U.S. penny .

Week 10: Baby’s elbows bend

Fetal development eight weeks after conception

Embryo eight weeks after conception

Fetal development eight weeks after conception

By the end of the tenth workweek of pregnancy — eight weeks after creation — your baby ‘s toes and fingers lose their webbing and become longer .
By the tenth workweek of pregnancy, or eight weeks after invention, your baby ‘s head has become more round .
Your child can now bend his or her elbows. Toes and fingers lose their webbing and become retentive. The eyelids and external ears continue to develop. The umbilical cord is distinctly visible .

Week 11: Baby’s genitals develop

At the begin of the 11th week of pregnancy, or the ninth workweek after invention, your baby ‘s capitulum silent makes up about half of its length. however, your baby ‘s body is about to catch up .
Your child is nowadays formally described as a fetus. This week your baby ‘s expression is across-the-board, the eyes wide separated, the eyelids fused and the ears humble set. Buds for future teeth appear. Red blood cells are beginning to form in your child ‘s liver. By the conclusion of this week, your baby ‘s external genitalia will start developing into a penis or a clitoris and labium majora .
By now your baby might measure about 2 inches ( 50 millimeters ) long from crown to rump — the length of the short slope of a credit card — and count about 1/3 ounce ( 8 grams ) .

Week 12: Baby’s fingernails form

Fetal development 10 weeks after conception

Embryo 10 weeks after conception

Fetal development 10 weeks after conception

By the end of the 12th week of pregnancy — 10 weeks after concept — your baby might weigh about 1/2 ounce ( 14 grams ) .
Twelve weeks into your pregnancy, or 10 weeks after invention, your baby is sprouting fingernails. Your child ‘s face immediately has taken on a more develop profile. His or her intestines are in the abdomen .
By now your baby might be about 2 1/2 inches ( 61 millimeters ) long from crown to rump — the length of the curtly side of a U.S. bill — and weigh about 1/2 ounce ( 14 grams ) .

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  1. Pregnancy: Stages of pregnancy. Office on Women’s Health. https://www.womenshealth.gov/pregnancy/youre-pregnant-now-what/stages-pregnancy. Accessed Feb. 25, 2020.
  2. Frequently asked questions: Pregnancy FAQ156: Prenatal development: How your fetus grows during pregnancy. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. https://www.acog.org/patient-resources/faqs/pregnancy/how-your-fetus-grows-during-pregnancy. Accessed Feb. 25, 2020.
  3. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Your Pregnancy and Childbirth Month to Month. 6th ed. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; 2015.
  4. Moore KL, et al. The Developing Human: Clinically Oriented Embryology. 11th ed. Elsevier; 2020. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 25, 2020.

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